FREE U-PICK at GO BOX Storage

raspberry upick FREE U PICK at GO BOX Storage

This is best raspberry crop we’ve had in the eight years we have been in Kamloops! The berries are huge!

GO BOX Storage is having a FREE u-pick for raspberries, sour cherries and red currents! The FREE u-pick will be for the week of July 21-25, 2014. Come and join us for a day of GLEANING WITHOUT GOVERNMENT.

It’s easy to get involved with the FREE u-pick:

  1. Like GO BOX Storage and the GO BOX Permaculture Project on Facebook.
  2. If you have already done so, get a friend to like us on Facebook. Bring your friend to the u-pick. It’s always more fun to u-pick with friends!
  3. Call before coming at 250.374.4646. The u-pick is open Monday to Friday, 8am-5pm. We need to know when you are coming to avoid the u-pick being picked-out for the day.

If your wondering what GLEANING WITHOUT GOVERNMENT money is all about please see: Why does society need to pay $45,000 to glean FREE fruit?

sour cherry upick FREE U PICK at GO BOX Storage

Sour cherries are packed with anthocyanins which naturally decreases inflammation.

Here’s more about the health benefits of sour cherries.

Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing

sesame dip 1 Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing

Sesame seeds make a nice base for a dip or dressing.

I have a long history of making recipes safe for people on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet which means removing all the industrial ingredients and working from whole food sources. This recipe is base on a Tahini Dressing recipe from Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen. I have replaced the commercial tahini with whole sesame seeds making this creamy dip at a lower cost while avoiding industrial food additives.

Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing
2c organic sesame seeds
6c filtered water
Soak the sesame seeds overnight in the filtered water. Drain the sesame seeds with a sieve and discard the water.

sesame dip 2 Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing

Soak the sesame seeds overnight. Drain the sesame seeds before making the dip.

2-3c soaked organic sesame seeds
4-6 large organic garlic cloves, minced
1tsp sea salt
1-2 organic bird’s eye peppers or other hot peppers
2/3c-1c filtered water
1c fresh garden parsley, chopped
1c fresh garden cilantro, chopped
2/3c organic extra virgin olive oil
1/4-1/3c fresh organic lemon juice or organic cider vinegar, to taste
In a Vitamix blender, mince the garlic. Add the sea salt, peppers and soaked sesame seeds. Add the water slowly and blend well into a smooth paste. Use less water for a dip or more water for a dressing. Add the olive oil and lemon juice or cider vinegar and blend until smooth. Add the parsley and cilantro and serve over salad, sliced vegetables or cooked seasonal greens.

sesame dip 3 Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing

Mince the garlic in the Vitamix before adding the salt, hot peppers and sesame seeds. Add the olive oil and lemon juice or cider vinegar. Blend until smooth.

sesame dip 4 Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing

Add the parsley and cilantro.

sesame dip 5 Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing

Blend in the herbs until smooth. If you like more texture in your dip, blend less.

If you are interesting in experimenting with seed cycling for hormonal balance, please see Herbal Academy of New England. Sesame Seed Dip or Dressing and Sesame Seed Halva would be good for luteal phase (day 15-28) of your menstrual cycle.

Flax Crackers

flax crackers Flax Crackers

These crackers are made with whole, yellow flax seeds. Flax crackers are great with pastured butter, raw cheese, pate or salsa.

To grind or not to grind, that is the question with Flax Crackers. There are benefits to both. Grinding the flax seeds gives a softer and moister cracker, that is easier to chew and is easier for some to digest. Using whole flax seeds will give a robust cracker that will hold up to heavy toppings. The whole seed cracker will have lots of crunch; chewing well before swallowing will insure good digestion. I like the whole seed cracker better but experiment and see which cracker you like best.

Flax Crackers
1c organic whole yellow flax seeds
1tsp sea salt
2c filtered water
1 organic bird’s eye pepper (optional)
1/2tsp organic basil, thyme and rosemary (optional)
Grind half the flax seeds in a spice grinder, if desired. In a large bowl add the ground and whole flax, sea salt, spices and water. Mix well. Soak overnight. In the morning, the flax will have mostly congealed. With a teaspoon or a tablespoon, scoop out some of the mixture and place on the dehydrator sheet. Smooth down into rounded crackers. Dehydrate at a low temperature for 12 hours or until the crackers are dry. Store in a dark, dry place.

Tomato Flax Crackers
1c organic whole yellow flax seeds
10-20 dried garden tomatoes
1tsp sea salt
2c filtered water
1 organic bird’s eye pepper (optional)
1/2tsp organic basil, thyme and rosemary (optional)
Grind half the flax seeds in a spice grinder, if desired. In a large bowl add the ground and whole flax, sea salt, spices and water. Mix well. Add the dried tomatoes to the top. Soak overnight. In the morning, the flax will have mostly congealed. Remove the soaked tomatoes and mince finely. Add the minced tomatoes back to bowl, and mix well. With a teaspoon or a tablespoon, scoop out some of the mixture and place on the dehydrator sheet. Smooth down into rounded crackers. Dehydrate at a low temperature for 12 hours or until the crackers are dry. Store in a dark, dry place.

If you are interesting in experimenting with seed cycling for hormonal balance, please see Herbal Academy of New England. Flax Crackers would be good for the follicular phase (day 1-14) and Sesame Seed Halva would be good for the luteal phase (day 15-28) of your menstrual cycle.

Homemade Fennel and Ginger Candy

fennel ginger candy Homemade Fennel and Ginger Candy

Put a small bowl on the table after a heavy meal to help with digestion. A teaspoon or two will suffice as a dessert and help digest a big meal. Fennel does have a mild estrogenic effect.

Many foods act as herbal remedies. Fennel, orange peel and ginger helps with digestion. This recipe is great following a curry or after any heavy meal.

My favorite orange peel comes from Mandarin oranges. When Mandarin orange season comes at Christmas, take the opportunity to dry the waste orange peels for use throughout the year. Otherwise regular oranges will work for peel. Just make sure they are organic. You don’t want to imbibe the chemicals used in industrial orange production. Before drying, break the peels up into small pieces, which makes the dried peels easier to process later.

1/4c organic whole fennel seeds
1T organic Mandarin orange peel, powdered
2T homemade Honeyed Ginger, minced
In a spice grinder, grind the dried organic peel into a fine powder. Sieve out large pieces if necessary. Finely mince the honey ginger and add the powdered peel and fennel seeds. Mix well and refrigerate. Put a small bowl on the table after a heavy meal to help with digestion.

Pass on Supplements and Eat Real Food

marinated heart Pass on Supplements and Eat Real Food

Let real food be your medicine and skip the supplements! It’s cheaper too!

Pass on the cost of supplementing with Coemzyme Q10, and eat beef heart!

I just made some marinated beef heart based on a recipe from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. It was delicious! I like heart with onions sautéed in butter or pastured lard. I cook the onions first then quickly cook the heart, a little more than I would cook liver. The heart went nicely with garden fresh zucchini sautéed in butter.

Marinated Heart
1/4c organic cider vinegar
1/4c organic extra-virgin olive oil
1tsp sea salt
1 bird’s eye chili pepper
1/2tsp organic whole cumin, ground
1 pastured beef heart

Carefully clean the heart and then cut it into four pieces. Remove any connective tissue and fat. (I gave the fat to the hens which are at their peak egg production. They need the fat more than I do!) Thinly slice the heart and marinate overnight.

marinated heart 2 Pass on Supplements and Eat Real Food

Organ meats are a superfood. Try to eat organ meats one or twice a week.

Here’s Chris Kesser on the nutrition in organ meats including heart. Here’s a Weston A Price Foundation article by Ron Schmid on dietary supplements. Here’s an old eatkamloops.org post called Supplement or Superfoods.